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Curriculum Standards for the 10 Most Populous States
Applicable to the Lesson Plan on Mass Casualties
and Making Decisions About War


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This lesson plan will either fully or partially satisfy the standards set out below:

California;   Florida;   Georgia;   Illinois;   Michigan;
New Jersey;   New York;   Ohio;   Pennsylvania;   Texas.
California

History and Social Sciences

Historical and Social Sciences Analysis Skills -- Grades 9 - 12
The intellectual skills noted below are to be learned through, and applied to, the content standards for grades nine through twelve. They are to be assessed only in conjunction with the content standards in grades nine through twelve. In addition to the standards for grades nine through twelve, students demonstrate the following intellectual, reasoning, reflection, and research skills.
Chronological and Spatial Thinking
1. Students compare the present with the past, evaluating the consequences of past events and decisions and determining the lessons that were learned.

2. Students analyze how change happens at different rates at different times; understand that some aspects can change while others remain the same; and understand that change is complicated and affects not only technology and politics but also values and beliefs.

3. Students use a variety of maps and documents to interpret human movement, including major patterns of domestic and international migration, changing environmental preferences and settlement patterns, the frictions that develop between population groups, and the diffusion of ideas, technological innovations, and goods.

4. Students relate current events to the physical and human characteristics of places and regions.
Historical Research, Evidence, and Point of View -- Grades 9 - 12
1. Students distinguish valid arguments from fallacious arguments in historical interpretations.

2. Students identify bias and prejudice in historical interpretations.

3. Students evaluate major debates among historians concerning alternative interpretations of the past, including an analysis of authors’ use of evidence and the distinctions between sound generalizations and misleading oversimplifications.

4. Students construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations.
Historical Interpretation -- Grades 9 - 12
1. Students show the connections, causal and otherwise, between particular historical events and larger social, economic, and political trends and developments.

2. Students recognize the complexity of historical causes and effects, including the limitations on determining cause and effect.

3. Students interpret past events and issues within the context in which an event unfolded rather than solely in terms of present-day norms and values.

4. Students understand the meaning, implication, and impact of historical events and recognize that events could have taken other directions.
10.8 Students analyze the causes and consequences of World War II.
  • Compare the German, Italian, and Japanese drives for empire in the 1930s, including the 1937 Rape of Nanking, other atrocities in China, and the Stalin-Hitler Pact of 1939.


  • Understand the role of appeasement, nonintervention (isolationism), and the domestic distractions in Europe and the United States prior to the outbreak of World War II.


  • Identify and locate the Allied and Axis powers on a map and discuss the major turning points of the war, the principal theaters of conflict, key strategic decisions, and the resulting war conferences and political resolutions, with emphasis on the importance of geographic factors.


  • Describe the political, diplomatic, and military leaders during the war (e.g., Winston Churchill, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Emperor Hirohito, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Joseph Stalin, Douglas MacArthur, Dwight Eisenhower).


  • Analyze the Nazi policy of pursuing racial purity, especially against the European Jews; its transformation into the Final Solution; and the Holocaust that resulted in the murder of six million Jewish civilians.


  • Discuss the human costs of the war, with particular attention to the civilian and military losses in Russia, Germany, Britain, the United States, China, and Japan.
  • 10.9 Students analyze the international developments in the post–World War II world.
    1. Compare the economic and military power shifts caused by the war, including the Yalta Pact, the development of nuclear weapons, Soviet control over Eastern European nations, and the economic recoveries of Germany and Japan.
    11.7 Students analyze America’s participation in World War II.
    7. Discuss the decision to drop atomic bombs and the consequences of the decision (Hiroshima and Nagasaki).




    Florida

    Sunshine State Standards/Social Studies Grades 9 - 12
    Standard 3: The student understands Western and Eastern civilization since the Renaissance. (SS.A.3.4) ...
    9. analyzes major historical events of the first half of the 20th century.

    10. understands the political, military, and economic events since the 1950s that have had a significant impact on international relations.
    Standard 5: The student understands U.S. history from 1880 to the present day. (SS.A.5.4) ...
    5. knows the origins and effects of the involvement of the United States in World War II.

    6. understands the political events that shaped the development of United States foreign policy since World War II and knows the characteristics of that policy.


    Georgia

    Georgia's Social Studies Performance Standards
    United States History Social Studies -- High School
    SSUSH19 The student will identify the origins, major developments, and the domestic impact of World War II, especially the growth of the federal government. ...
    e. describe Los Alamos and the scientific, economic, and military implications of developing the atomic bomb.


    Illinois

    Illinois Learning Standards for Social Science

    STATE GOAL 14: Understand political systems, with an emphasis on the United States.
    D. Understand the roles and influences of individuals and interest groups in the political systems of Illinois, the United States and other nations. ...
    14.D.5 (Late High School) Interpret a variety of public policies and issues from the perspectives of different individuals and groups. ...

    14.E.4 (Early High School) Analyze historical trends of United States foreign policy (e.g., emergence as a world leader - military, industrial, financial).

    14.E.5 (Late High School) Analyze relationships and tensions among members of the international community.
    STATE GOAL 16: Understand events, trends, individuals and movements shaping the history of Illinois, the United States and other nations.
    HISTORICAL ERAS -- Local, State and United States History (US) ...
    • Prosperity, depression, the New Deal and World War II from 1920 to 1945

    • Post World War II and the Cold War from 1945 to 1968
    HISTORICAL ERAS -- World History ...
    • The twentieth century to 1945

    • The contemporary world from 1945 to the present
    A. Apply the skills of historical analysis and interpretation. ...
    16.A.3a (Middle/Junior High School) Describe how historians use models for organizing historical interpretation (e.g., biographies, political events, issues and conflicts).

    16.A.4a (Early High School) Analyze and report historical events to determine cause-and-effect relationships.

    16.A.5a (Late High School) Analyze historical and contemporary developments using methods of historical inquiry (pose questions, collect and analyze data, make and support inferences with evidence, report findings).

    16.A.3b (Middle/Junior High School) Make inferences about historical events and eras using historical maps and other historical sources. ...

    16.A.3c (Middle/Junior High School) Identify the differences between historical fact and interpretation. ...

    16.A.4b (Early High School)Compare competing historical interpretations of an event.

    16.A.5b (Late High School) Explain the tentative nature of historical interpretations. ...
    B. Understand the development of significant political events. ...
    16.B.3d (US) ((Middle/Junior High School) Describe ways in which the United States developed as a world political power. ...

    16.B.5c (W) (Late High School) Analyze the relationship of an issue in world political history to the related aspects of world economic, social and environmental history.

    Michigan Epic Project
    Michigan

    Middle School

    I. Historical Perspective
      Content Standard 1
        Time & Chronology:
        1. Construct and interpret timelines of people and events from the history of Michigan and the United States through the era of Reconstruction and from the history of other regions of the world.
        2. Describe major factors that characterize the following eras in United States history: The Meeting of Three Worlds (beginnings to 1620), Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763), Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1815), Expansion and Reform (1801-1861) and Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877).
        3. Select a contemporary condition in Africa, Asia, Canada, Europe and Latin America and trace some of the major historical origins of each.
      Content Standard 2
        Comprehending The Past:
        1. Use narratives and graphic data to describe the settings of significant events that shaped the development of Michigan as a state and the United States as a nation during the eras prior to Reconstruction.
        2. Identify and explain how individuals in history demonstrated good character and personal virtue.
        3. Select conditions in various parts of the world and describe how they have been shaped by events from the past.
        4. Use historical biographies to explain how events from the past affected the lives of individuals and how some individuals influenced the course of history.
      Content Standard 3
        Analyzing and Interpreting the Past:
        1. Use primary and secondary records to analyze significant events that shaped the development of Michigan as a state and the United States as a nation prior to the end of the era of Reconstruction.
        2. Analyze interpretations of major events selected from African, Asian, Canadian, European and Latin American history to reveal the perspectives of the authors.
        3. Show that historical knowledge is tentative and subject to change by describing interpretations of the past that have been revised when new information was uncovered.
        4. Compose narratives of events from the history of Michigan and of the United States prior to the era of Reconstruction.
      Content Standard 4
        Judging Decisions from the Past:
        1. Identify major decisions in Michigan and the United States history prior to the end of the era of Reconstruction, analyze contemporary factors contributing to the decisions and consider alternative courses of action.
        2. Identify major decisions in the history of Africa, Asia, Canada, Europe and Latin America, analyze contemporary factors contributing to the decisions and consider alternative courses of action.
        3. Identify the responses of individuals to historic violations of human dignity involving discrimination, persecution and crimes against humanity.
        4. Select historic decisions and evaluate them in light of core democratic values and resulting costs and benefits as viewed from a variety of perspectives.
    II. Geographic Perspective
      Content Standard 1
        People, Places and Cultures:
        1. Locate and describe the diverse places, cultures, and communities of major world regions.
        2. Describe and compare characteristics of major world cultures including language, religion, belief systems, gender roles, and traditions.
        3. Explain why people live and work as they do in different regions.
      Content Standard 2
        Human/Environment Interaction:
        1. Locate, describe, and compare the ecosystems, resources, and human environment interactions of major world regions.
        2. Locate major ecosystems, describe their characteristics, and explain the process that created them.
        3. Explain the importance of different kinds of ecosystems to people.
        4. Explain how humans modify the environment and describe some of the possible consequences of those modifications.
        5. Describe the consequences of human/environment interactions in several different types of environment.
      Content Standard 3
        Location, Movement and Connections:
        1. Locate and describe major economic activities and occupations of major world regions and explain the reasons for their locations.
        2. Explain how governments have divided land and sea areas into different regions.
        3. Describe how and why people, goods and services, and information move within world regions and between regions.
        4. Describe the major economic and political connections between the United States and different world regions and explain their causes and consequences.
      Content Standard 4
        Regions, Patterns and Processes:
        1. Draw a sketch map of the world from memory.
        2. Locate and describe major cultural, economic, political and environmental features of Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia and North and South America and the processes that created them.
        3. Describe major patterns of world population, physical features, ecosystems, cultures and explain some of the factors causing the patterns.
        4. Compare major world regions with respect to cultures, economy, governmental systems, environment, and communications.
      Content Standard 5
        Global Issues and Events:
        1. Describe how social and scientific changes in regions may have global consequences.
        2. Describe the geographic aspects of events taking place in different world regions.
        3. Explain how elements of the physical geography, culture, and history of the region may be influencing current events.
    III. Civic Perspective
      Content Standard 5
        American Government and World Affairs:
        1. Describe the purposes and functions of major international, governmental organizations.
        2. Describe means used by the United States to resolve international conflicts.
    V. Inquiry
      Content Standard 1
        Information Processing:
          2. Use traditional and electronic means to organize social science information and to make maps, graphs, and tables.
          3. Interpret social science information about the natural environment and cultures of countries from a variety of primary and secondary sources.
      Content Standard 2
        Conducting Investigations:
        1. Pose a social science question about a culture, world region, or international problem.
        2. Gather and analyze information using appropriate information technologies to answer the question posed.
        3. Construct an answer to the question posed and support their answer with evidence.
        4. Report the results of their investigation including procedures followed and possible alternative conclusions.
    VI. Public Discourse and Decision Making
      Content Standard 1
        Identifying and Analyzing Issues:
        1. State public policy issues and their related ethical, definitional, and factual issues as questions.
        2. Trace the origins of a public issue.
        3. Explain how culture and experiences shape positions that people take on an issue.
      Content Standard 2
        Group Discussion:
          1. Engage each other in conversations which attempt to clarify and resolve national and international policy issues.
      Content Standard 3
        Persuasive Writing Benchmark:
          1. Compose essays expressing decisions on national and international policy issues.
    VII. Citizen Involvement
      Content Standard 1
        Responsible Personal Conduct:
          1. Use laws and other ethical rules to evaluate their own conduct and the conduct of others.
          2. Engage in activities intended to contribute to solving a national or international problem they have studied.
    High School

    I. Historical Perspective
      Content Standard 1
        Time & Chronology:
        1. Construct and interpret timelines of people and events from the history of Michigan and the United States through the era of Reconstruction and from the history of other regions of the world.
        2. Describe major factors that characterize the following eras in United States history: The Meeting of Three Worlds (beginnings to 1620), Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763), Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1815), Expansion and Reform (1801-1861) and Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877).
        3. Select a contemporary condition in Africa, Asia, Canada, Europe and Latin America and trace some of the major historical origins of each. Content Standard 2 Comprehending The Past:
        4. Use narratives and graphic data to describe the settings of significant events that shaped the development of Michigan as a state and the United States as a nation during the eras prior to Reconstruction.
        5. Identify and explain how individuals in history demonstrated good character and personal virtue.
        6. Select conditions in various parts of the world and describe how they have been shaped by events from the past.
        7. Use historical biographies to explain how events from the past affected the lives of individuals and how some individuals influenced the course of history.
      Content Standard 3
        Analyzing and Interpreting the Past:
        1. Use primary and secondary records to analyze significant events that shaped the development of Michigan as a state and the United States as a nation prior to the end of the era of Reconstruction.
        2. Analyze interpretations of major events selected from African, Asian, Canadian, European and Latin American history to reveal the perspectives of the authors.
        3. Show that historical knowledge is tentative and subject to change by describing interpretations of the past that have been revised when new information was uncovered.
        4. Compose narratives of events from the history of Michigan and of the United States prior to the era of Reconstruction.
      Content Standard 4
        Judging Decisions from the Past:
        1. Identify major decisions in Michigan and the United States history prior to the end of the era of Reconstruction, analyze contemporary factors contributing to the decisions and consider alternative courses of action.
        2. Identify major decisions in the history of Africa, Asia, Canada, Europe and Latin America, analyze contemporary factors contributing to the decisions and consider alternative courses of action.
        3. Identify the responses of individuals to historic violations of human dignity involving discrimination, persecution and crimes against humanity.
        4. Select historic decisions and evaluate them in light of core democratic values and resulting costs and benefits as viewed from a variety of perspectives.
    II. Geographic Perspective
      Content Standard 1
        People, Places and Cultures:
        1. Locate and describe the diverse places, cultures, and communities of major world regions.
        2. Describe and compare characteristics of major world cultures including language, religion, belief systems, gender roles, and traditions.
        3. Explain why people live and work as they do in different regions.
      Content Standard 2
        Human/Environment Interaction:
        1. Locate, describe, and compare the ecosystems, resources, and human environment interactions of major world regions.
        2. Locate major ecosystems, describe their characteristics, and explain the process that created them.
        3. Explain the importance of different kinds of ecosystems to people.
        4. Explain how humans modify the environment and describe some of the possible consequences of those modifications.
        5. Describe the consequences of human/environment interactions in several different types of environment.
      Content Standard 3
        Location, Movement and Connections:
        1. Locate and describe major economic activities and occupations of major world regions and explain the reasons for their locations.
        2. Explain how governments have divided land and sea areas into different regions.
        3. Describe how and why people, goods and services, and information move within world regions and between regions.
        4. Describe the major economic and political connections between the United States and different world regions and explain their causes and consequences.
      Content Standard 4
        Regions, Patterns and Processes:
        1. Draw a sketch map of the world from memory.
        2. Locate and describe major cultural, economic, political and environmental features of Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia and North and South America and the processes that created them.
        3. Describe major patterns of world population, physical features, ecosystems, cultures and explain some of the factors causing the patterns.
        4. Compare major world regions with respect to cultures, economy, governmental systems, environment, and communications.
      Content Standard 5
        Global Issues and Events:
        1. Describe how social and scientific changes in regions may have global consequences.
        2. Describe the geographic aspects of events taking place in different world regions.
        3. Explain how elements of the physical geography, culture, and history of the region may be influencing current events.
    III. Civic Perspective
      Content Standard 5
        American Government and World Affairs:
          1. Describe the purposes and functions of major international, governmental organizations. 2. Describe means used by the United States to resolve international conflicts.
    V. Inquiry
      Content Standard 1
        Information Processing:
        1. Locate and interpret information about the natural environments and cultures of countries using a variety of primary and secondary sources and electronic technologies, including computers and telecommunications where appropriate.
        2. Use traditional and electronic means to organize social science information and to make maps, graphs, and tables.
        3. Interpret social science information about the natural environment and cultures of countries from a variety of primary and secondary sources.
        Content Standard 2
          Conducting Investigations:
          1. Pose a social science question about a culture, world region, or international problem.
          2. Gather and analyze information using appropriate information technologies to answer the question posed.
          3. Construct an answer to the question posed and support their answer with evidence.
          4. Report the results of their investigation including procedures followed and possible alternative conclusions.
    VI. Public Discourse and Decision Making
      Content Standard 1
        Identifying and Analyzing Issues:
        1. State public policy issues and their related ethical, definitional, and factual issues as questions.
        2. Trace the origins of a public issue.
        3. Explain how culture and experiences shape positions that people take on an issue.
      Content Standard 2
        Group Discussion:
          1. Engage each other in conversations which attempt to clarify and resolve national and international policy issues.
      Content Standard 3
        Persuasive Writing Benchmark:
          1. Compose essays expressing decisions on national and international policy issues.


      New Jersey

      New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Social Studies

      6.1: ALL STUDENTS WILL UTILIZE HISTORICAL THINKING, PROBLEM SOLVING, AND RESEARCH SKILLS TO MAXIMIZE THEIR UNDERSTANDING OF CIVICS, HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, AND ECONOMICS.
      Building upon the knowledge and skills gained in the previous grades, by the end of Grade 8 students will:
      A. Social Studies Skills
      1. Analyze how events are related over time.

      2. Use critical thinking skills to interpret events, recognize bias, point of view, and context....

      4. Analyze data in order to see persons and events in context.

      5. Examine current issues, events, or themes and relate them to past events.

      6. Formulate questions based on information needs....

      8. Compare and contrast competing interpretations of current and historical events.

      9. Interpret events considering continuity and change, the role of chance, oversight and error, and changing interpretations by historians....

      11. Summarize information in written, graphic, and oral formats.
      Building upon the knowledge and skills gained in the previous grades, by the end of Grade 12 students will:
      A. Social Studies Skills
      1. Analyze how historical events shape the modern world.

      2. Formulate questions and hypotheses from multiple perspectives, using multiple sources.

      ... 4. Examine source data within the historical, social, political, geographic, or economic context in which it was created, testing credibility and evaluating bias.

      5. Evaluate current issues, events, or themes and trace their evolution through historical periods.

      6. Apply problem-solving skills to national, state, or local issues and propose reasoned solutions.

      7. Analyze social, political, and cultural change and evaluate the impact of each on local, state, national, and international issues and events.

      8. Evaluate historical and contemporary communications to identify factual accuracy, soundness of evidence, and absence of bias and discuss strategies used by the government, political candidates, and the media to communicate with the public.
      STANDARD 6.2 (CIVICS) ALL STUDENTS WILL KNOW, UNDERSTAND AND APPRECIATE THE VALUES AND PRINCIPLES OF AMERICAN DEMOCRACY AND THE RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND ROLES OF A CITIZEN IN THE NATION AND THE WORLD.
      Building upon knowledge and skills gained in preceding grades, by the end of Grade 12, students will: ...
      E. International Education: Global Challenges, Cultures, and Connections
      1. Compare and contrast key past and present United States foreign policy actions (e.g., diplomacy, economic aid, humanitarian aid, military aid) and positions (e.g., treaties, sanctions, interventions) and evaluate their consequences.

      2. Analyze and evaluate United States foreign policy actions and positions, including the Monroe Doctrine, the Mexican Cession, the Truman Doctrine, the Cold War, the world-wide struggle against terrorism, and the Iraq War. ...

      6. Investigate a global challenge (e.g., hunger, AIDS, nuclear defense, global warming) in depth and over time, predict the impact if the current situation does not change, and offer possible solutions. ...

      14. Connect the concept of universal human rights to world events and issues.

      15. Compare and contrast current and past genocidal acts and other acts of hatred and violence for the purposes of subjugation and exploitation (e.g., Holocaust, Native Americans, Irish famine, Armenia, Ukrainian collectivization, Cambodia, Rwanda) and discuss present and future actions by individuals and governments to prevent the reoccurrence of such events.
      STANDARD 6.3 (WORLD HISTORY) ALL STUDENTS WILL DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF WORLD HISTORY IN ORDER TO UNDERSTAND LIFE AND EVENTS IN THE PAST AND HOW THEY RELATE TO THE PRESENT AND THE FUTURE.
      Building upon knowledge and skills gained in preceding grades, by the end of Grade 12, students will: ...
      F. The Era of the Great Wars (1914-1945) ...
      2. Analyze the background and global consequences of actions leading to World War II, including: ...
      Other twentieth century genocides, (e.g., Turkey/Armenia, Soviet forced collectivization in the Ukraine, Japan’s occupations in China and Korea)

      Evaluate the importance of the beginning of the Atomic Age in science, the technological revolution, and the implications of military technology used in war
      STANDARD 6.4 (UNITED STATES AND NEW JERSEY HISTORY) ALL STUDENTS WILL DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF UNITED STATES AND NEW JERSEY HISTORY IN ORDER TO UNDERSTAND LIFE AND EVENTS IN THE PAST AND HOW THEY RELATE TO THE PRESENT AND FUTURE.
      J. The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945) ...
      5. Compare and contrast key events and people involved with the causes, course, and consequences of World War II, including:
      Axis Powers

      Yalta Conference

      Potsdam Conference

      Winston Churchill

      J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Manhattan Project

      Franklin D. Roosevelt

      Harry Truman

      Joseph Stalin and the role of the USSR
      6. Describe ... the use of the Atom Bomb, ....

      7. Describe New Jersey’s role in World War II, including: ... The contributions of Albert Einstein
      New York

      Standard 1—History of the United Statesand New York
      Commencement
      analyze the decisions leading to major turning points in United States history, comparing alternative courses of action, and hypothesizing, within the context of the historic period, about what might have happened if the decision had been different. Investigate decisions and actions such as: - Roosevelt’s New Deal


      New York -- GRADES 7 AND 8 Social Studies -- Unit 10 -- The United States Assumes Worldwide Responsibilities
      I.    World War II
      Objectives
      3. To investigate key turning points in New York State and United States history and explain why these events or developments are significant ...

      5. To analyze the role played by the United States in international politics, past and present

      6. To describe historic events through the eyes and experiences of those who were there
      Content Outline:
      E. New Aspects of the War
      ... 2. Aerial bombing

      3. New technology and its impact on people and the physical environment

      4. Atomic bomb - the Manhattan Project ...

      6. Concept of unconditional surrender
      G. End of the War
      3. Defeat of Japan
      H. Impact of the War
      1. Entire countries were physically and demographically devastated—effects of physical and human geographic factors

      2. Millions of families suffered the loss of loved ones

      3. The Nazi Holocaust - Hitler’s “Final Solution;” worldwide horror; human rights violations ...

      7. Advent of the nuclear age
      II.    THE UNITED STATES IN THE POST-WORLD WAR II WORLD
      Objectives:
      1. To understand why the United States had to assume a leadership role in the post-World War II world;

      2. To appreciate the historical background for the formation of United States foreign policy of this era;

      3. To understand the relationship between the relative importance of United States domestic and foreign policies over time;

      4. To analyze the role played by the United States in international politics, past and present.
      Content Outline:
      B. United States and the Soviet Union Emerge as World Leaders
      1. Bipolarism;

      2. The Cold War;

      This looks like high school curriculum

      VII. A Half Century of Crisis and Achievement (1900-1945)
      E. World War II- Causes and Impact

      ...

      4. Impacts of Technology on Total War

      5. Hiroshima and Nagasaki



      New York -- UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

      UNIT SIX: THE UNITED STATES IN AN AGE OF GLOBAL CRISIS: RESPONSIBILITY AND COOPERATION
      I. Peace in Peril 1933 - 1950

      4. The atomic bomb
      a. The Manhattan Project (role of refugees)

      b. Truman’s decision to use the atomic bomb against Japan: Hiroshima and Nagasaki


      Ohio Social Studies Content Standards

      Grade 9

      Social Studies Benchmarks -- Social Studies Skills and Methods
      A. Evaluate the reliability and credibility of sources.

      B. Use data and evidence to support or refute a thesis.
      Social Studies Benchmarks -- History:
      E. Analyze connections between World War II, the Cold War and contemporary conflicts.
      Academic Content Standards
      People in Societies -- 2. Analyze the results of political, economic, and social oppression and the violation of human rights including:
      .... b. The Holocaust and other acts of genocide, including those that have occurred in Armenia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Iraq.
      20th Century Conflict -- 11. Analyze the consequences of World War II including:
      a. Atomic weapons;
      Grade 10

      The United States in the 20th Century -- 11. Analyze the impact of U.S. participation in World War II with emphasis on:

      20th Century Conflict -- 7. Analyze the impact of U.S. participation in World War II, with emphasis on the change from isolationism to international involvement including the reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor.
      Grades 11 - 12
      Social Studies Skills and Methods
      B. Critique data and information to determine the adequacy of support for conclusions.

      C. Develop a research project that identifies the various perspectives on an issue and explain a resolution of that issue.

      D. Work in groups to analyze an issue and make decisions.


      Pennsylvania

      Academic Standards for History

      Grades 10 - 12
      8.1. Historical Analysis and Skill Development

      (These are learned through and applied to the standards statements and their descriptors for ... 8.3. United States History and 8.4. World History.)
      A. Evaluate chronological thinking.
      • Sequential order of historical narrative

      • Continuity and change

      • Context for events

      B. Synthesize and evaluate historical sources.
      • Literal meaning of historical passages;

      • Data in historical and contemporary maps, graphs and tables;

      • Different historical perspectives;

      • Visual data presented in historical evidence.

      C. Evaluate historical interpretation of events
      • Impact of opinions on the perception of facts;

      • Issues and problems in the past

      • Multiple points of view;

      • Illustrations in historical stories and sources;

      • Connections between causes and results;

      • Author or source of historical narratives’ points of view;

      • Central issue evidence.
      D. Synthesize historical research.
      • Historical event (time and place);

      • Historical questions;

      • Primary sources;

      • Secondary sources;

      • Conclusions (e.g., Senior Projects, research papers, debates);

      • Credibility of evidence;
      8.3 United States History
      A. Identify and evaluate the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups to United States history from 1890 to Present.
      • Political Leaders (e.g., ... Franklin D. Roosevelt);

      • Military Leaders (e.g., Douglas MacArthur, Dwight D. Eisenhower);

      • Innovators and Reformers ...;
      B. Identify and evaluate primary documents, material artifacts and historic sites important in United States history from 1890 to Present.
      • Documents
      8.4 World History
      A. Evaluate the significance of individuals and groups who made major political and cultural contributions to world history since 1450.
      • Political and Military Leaders ...;

      • Innovators and Reformers ...;
      B. Evaluate historical documents, material artifacts and historic sites important to world history since 1450.
      • Documents, Writings and Oral Traditions ...;
      C. Evaluate how continuity and change throughout history has impacted belief systems and religions, commerce and industry, innovations, settlement patterns, social organization, transportation and roles of women since 1450. ...

      D. Evaluate how conflict and cooperation among social groups and organizations impacted world history from 1450 to Present in Africa, Americas, Asia and Europe. ...
      • Military Conflicts


      Texas

      Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies, High School.

      §113.32. United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (One Credit). -- High School ...
      (c) Knowledge and skills.
      (6) History. The student understands the impact of significant national and international decisions and conflicts from World War II and the Cold War to the present on the United States. The student is expected to:
      ... (B) analyze major issues and events of World War II such as fighting the war on multiple fronts, the internment of Japanese-Americans, the Holocaust, the battle of Midway, the invasion of Normandy, and the development of and Harry Truman's decision to use the atomic bomb; ...

      (D) describe U.S. responses to Soviet aggression after World War II, including the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and the Berlin airlift; ....
      (22) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of science and technology on the economic development of the United States. The student is expected to:
      (A) explain the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as electric power, the telegraph and telephone, petroleum-based products, medical vaccinations, and computers on the development of the United States;

      (B) explain how scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as those in agriculture, the military, and medicine resulted from specific needs; ...
      (26) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:
      (A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

      (B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



    Last updated July 28, 2007.

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