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SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS FOR THE PAW PROJECT


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Additional Discussion Questions:
      Social-Emotional Learning
      Moral-Ethical Emphasis
            (Character Counts)

Other Sections:
      Bridges to Reading in Animal Rights
      Links to the Internet
      Selected State Civics Standards
      CCSS (Common Core) Anchor Standards
      Selected Awards & Cast


Social-Emotional Learning Discussion Questions


CARING FOR ANIMALS

See Discussion Questions 5 & 6 in the main page of the lesson plan.


Moral-Ethical Emphasis Discussion Questions (Character Counts)
(TeachWithMovies.com is a Character Counts "Six Pillars Partner"
and  uses The Six Pillars of Character to to organize ethical



CITIZENSHIP


See discussion Discussion Question # 7 in the main page of the lesson plan.



Bridges to Reading:

High school students interested in animal issues will particularly enjoy the following books:
    Where the Blind Horse Sings by Kathy Stevens;

    Thanking the Monkey by Karen Dawn


Advanced high school and college level students should be referred to the classic that has inspired millions of people world-wide and which was an inspiration to Dr. Conrad, Peter Singer's Animal Liberation.

Links to the Internet:


SELECTED STATE CIVICS/GOVERNMENT CURRICULUM STANDARDS

California Grade 12 Standards — Principles of American Democracy
    12.2      Students evaluate and take and defend positions on the scope and limits of rights and obligations as democratic citizens, the relationships among them, and how they are secured.

    12.2.1    Discuss the meaning and importance of each of the rights guaranteed under the Bill of Rights and how each is secured (e.g., freedom of . . . assembly [and] petition . . . ).

    12.2.2    Explain how economic rights are secured and their importance to the individual and to society (e.g., the right to acquire, use, transfer, and dispose of property; right to choose one's work; right to join or not join labor unions; copyright and patent).

    . . . .

    12.2.4    Understand the obligations of civic-mindedness, including voting, being informed on civic issues, volunteering and performing public service, and serving in the military or alternative service.

    12.3      Students evaluate, take, and defend positions on what the fundamental values and principles of civil society are (i.e., the autonomous sphere of voluntary personal, social, and economic relations that are not part of government), their interdependence, and the meaning and importance of those values and principles for a free society.

    12.3.1    Explain how civil society provides opportunities for individuals to associate for social, cultural, religious, economic, and political purposes.

    12.3.2    Explain how civil society makes it possible for people, individually or in association with others, to bring their influence to bear on government in ways other than voting and elections. . . .

    12.7      Students analyze and compare the powers and procedures of the national, state, tribal, and local governments.

    12.7.1    Explain how conflicts between levels of government and branches of government are resolved.

    12.7.2    Identify the major responsibilities and sources of revenue for state and local governments.

    12.7.3    Discuss reserved powers and concurrent powers of state governments.

    12.7.4    Discuss the Ninth and Tenth Amendments and interpretations of the extent of the federal government's power.

    12.7.5    Explain how public policy is formed, including the setting of the public agenda and implementation of it through regulations and executive orders.

    12.7.6    Compare the processes of lawmaking at each of the three levels of government, including the role of lobbying and the media. . . .

    12.8      Students evaluate and take and defend positions on the influence of the media on American political life. . . .

    12.8.2    Describe the roles of broadcast, print, and electronic media, including the Internet, as means of communication in American politics. . .

    12.10      Students formulate questions about and defend their analyses of tensions within our constitutional democracy and the importance of maintaining a balance between the following concepts: majority rule and individual rights; liberty and equality; state and national authority in a federal system; civil disobedience and the rule of law; freedom of the press and the right to a fair trial; the relationship of religion and government.




Chapter 113. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies
Subchapter C. High School

    §113.41. United States History Studies Since 1877 (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.
      (b)Introduction
        (8) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.

        (23) Citizenship. The student understands efforts to expand the democratic process. The student is expected to:
          (A) identify and analyze methods of expanding the right to participate in the democratic process, including lobbying, non-violent protesting, litigation, and amendments to the U.S. Constitution; . . .

          (C) explain how participation in the democratic process reflects our national ethos, patriotism, and civic responsibility as well as our progress to build a "more perfect union."
    §113.42. World History Studies (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.
      (b)Introduction
        (10) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.

        **
          (21) Citizenship. The student understands the significance of political choices and decisions made by individuals, groups, and nations throughout history. The student is expected to: . . .

          (B) describe the rights and responsibilities of citizens and noncitizens in civic participation throughout history; and
    §113.43. World Geography Studies (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.

      (b)Introduction

        (8) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.

        (15) Citizenship. The student understands how different points of view influence the development of public policies and decision-making processes on local, state, national, and international levels. The student is expected to:
          (A) identify and give examples of different points of view that influence the development of public policies and decision-making processes on local, state, national, and international levels; and

    §113.44. United States Government (One-Half Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.

      (b) Introduction.

        (1) In United States Government, the focus is on the principles and beliefs upon which the United States was founded and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. This course is the culmination of the civic and governmental content and concepts studied from Kindergarten through required secondary courses. . . . Students analyze the impact of individuals, political parties, interest groups, and the media on the American political system, evaluate the importance of voluntary individual participation in a constitutional republic . . . . Students examine the relationship between governmental policies and the culture of the United States. Students . . . . and use critical-thinking skills to create a product on a contemporary government issue. . . .

        (8) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U.S. citizens and the local, state, and federal governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents.

      (c) Knowledge and skills.

        (2) History. The student understands the roles played by individuals, political parties, interest groups, and the media in the U.S. political system, past and present. The student is expected to:

          (A) give examples of the processes used by individuals, political parties, interest groups, or the media to affect public policy; and

          (B) analyze the impact of political changes brought about by individuals, political parties, interest groups, or the media, past and present.

        (3) Geography. The student understands how geography can influence U.S. political divisions and policies. The student is expected to:

          (A) understand how population shifts affect voting patterns;

          (B) examine political boundaries to make inferences regarding the distribution of political power; and

        (8) Government. The student understands the structure and functions of the government created by the U.S. Constitution. The student is expected to:

          (H) compare the structures, functions, and processes of national, state, and local governments in the U.S. federal system.

        (9) Government. The student understands the concept of federalism. The student is expected to:

          (B) categorize government powers as national, state, or shared; . . .

          (D) understand the limits on the national and state governments in the U.S. federal system of government. . . . .

        (11) Government. The student understands the role of political parties in the U.S. system of government. The student is expected to:

          (C) identify opportunities for citizens to participate in political party activities at local, state, and national levels.

        (14) Citizenship. The student understands the difference between personal and civic responsibilities. The student is expected to:

          (A) explain the difference between personal and civic responsibilities;

          (B) evaluate whether and/or when the obligation of citizenship requires that personal desires and interests be subordinated to the public good;

          (C) understand the responsibilities, duties, and obligations of citizenship such as being well informed about civic affairs, serving in the military, voting, serving on a jury, observing the laws, paying taxes, and serving the public good; and . . . .

        (15) Citizenship. The student understands the importance of voluntary individual participation in the U.S. constitutional republic. The student is expected to:

          (A) analyze the effectiveness of various methods of participation in the political process at local, state, and national levels;

          (B) analyze historical and contemporary examples of citizen movements to bring about political change or to maintain continuity; and . . .

        (16) Citizenship. The student understands the importance of the expression of different points of view in a constitutional republic. The student is expected to:

          (A) examine different points of view of political parties and interest groups . . . . on important contemporary issues; and

          (B) analyze the importance of the First Amendment rights of petition, assembly, speech, and press . . . .
    §113.47. Special Topics in Social Studies (One-Half Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012. c. Skills **

      (20) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

        (A) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

        (B) create a product on a contemporary government issue or topic using critical methods of inquiry;

        (C) analyze and defend a point of view on a current political issue;

        (D) analyze and evaluate the validity of information, arguments, and counterarguments from primary and secondary sources for bias, propaganda, point of view, and frame of reference; . . . .

      (A) use social studies terminology correctly;

      (B) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;

      (C) transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and

      (D) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.

    (22) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

      (A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

      (B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.


      Illinois Learning Standards

      STATE GOAL 14: Understand political systems, with an emphasis on the United States.

      Why This Goal Is Important: . . . Through the study of various forms and levels of governŽment and the documents and institutions of the United States, students will develop the skills and knowledge that they need to be contributing citizens, now and in the future.

      A. Understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.

      Early High School
        14.A.4 Analyze how local, state and national governments serve the purposes for which they were created.
      C. Understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.

      Early High School
        14.C.4 Describe the meaning of parŽticipatory citizenship (e.g., volunteerism, voting) at all levels of government and society in the United States.
      D. Understand the roles and influŽences of individuals and interest groups in the political systems of Illinois, the United States and other nations.

      Early High School
        14.D.4 Analyze roles and influences of individuals, groups and media in shaping current debates on state and national policies.
      Late High School
        14.D.5 Interpret a variety of public policies and issues from the perspectives of different individuals and groups.


      New York

      [coming soon]


      Selected Awards, Cast and Director:

      Selected Awards: The Paw Project has been an official selection in the following film festivals:
        Binational Independent Film Festival
        Northwest VEG "Films To Change The World" Series
        Cinema Verde Film Festival - Winner of Education Award
        Tampa VegFest Film Festival
        Long Beach Kindness Film Festival
        The West Coast Film Festival
        4th Annual Awareness Festival
        Malibu Film Society
        Denver Film Society


      Featured Actors: Jennifer Conrad

      Director: Jennifer Conrad.









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