Notes on Movies for Which a Learning Guide has Not
Been Written -- Titles Starting with the Letter "P"


A,   B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    I,    J,   KLM,  
N,   O,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   

For the meanings of the initials in brackets at the end of many of the entries, click here.



The Painted Veil    (2006) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some mature sexual situations, partial nudity, disturbing images and brief drug content; Director: John Curran.    This is a beautiful and lyric movie based on a novel by Somerset Maugham. It shows an emerging nationalist China in 1925 during a cholera epidemic. A British doctor tries to fight the epidemic while resolving with his wife the issue of her past adultery. The movie raises interesting issues of relations between colonizers and the Chinese, shows a cholera epidemic and the efforts to deal with it, the danger of not letting go of anger in a relationship, and an immature woman learning about love the hard way. There are several glimpses of couples making love. In the most explicit we see the heroine's back as she makes love in the superior position for a few seconds. PG-13 is an appropriate rating for this movie. We have not compared the film to the novel. The question is whether the lessons of this movie are sufficient to devote class time to it. It is a definite possibility as a treat for kids in a class dealing with China or world history. Parents with children thirteen years and older studying China, colonialism or world history who will allow their children to see PG-13 films might find it a good movie to watch with their children. [LI] (JAF & DEF)

The Palm Beach Story    (1942) No MPAA Rating; Director: Preston Sturges.    This film is ranked #77 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Panic In The Year Zero    (1962)No MPAA Rating; Director: Ray Milland.    This is an unrealistic movie about nuclear holocaust. See Nuclear War Films. [NR]

Pan's Labyrinth    (2006) MPAA Rating: R for graphic violence and some language; Director: Guillermo del Toro.    This is a beautiful and well made movie about fantastic creatures and the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War. However, it is quite violent. [NR] (JAF & DEF)

Paper Clips    (2004) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Elliot Berlin, Joe Fab.    This is an excellent and illuminating film. The story is about a school in a small southern town which undertakes and is transformed by a Holocaust project. We will do a Guide for this movie. [LI] (JAF & DEF)

The Paradine Case    (1947) No MPAA Rating; Director: Alfred Hitchcock.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

Paradise Alley    (1978) MPAA Rating: PG; Directed and Written By: Sylvester Stallone.    Mr. Stallone reportedly received $500,000 from a tobacco company in return for his agreement to use tobacco products during five of his movies. We find this conduct to be reprehensible. Before showing any Stallone film to children, disclose Mr. Stallone's shameful conduct and warn them about smoking. [NR]

Parenthood    (1989) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Ron Howard.    This is a delightful comedy for adults with many good messages about raising children and dealing with problems in life. It contains scenes involving vibrators and oral sex and these we feel disqualify it. When your kids are grown, married, and have children, suggest this film to them. See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

Paris Is Burning    (1990) No MPAA Rating; Director: Jennie Livingston.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Paris, je t'aime    (2006) MPAA Rating: R for language and brief drug use; Directors: Multiple. This is a series of vignettes about the lives of people who happen to be in Paris. The movie could have been shot in any other large city. The themes are mature. Some of the stories are excellent and others prosaic and uninteresting. The quality is spotty. Drama or English Language Arts teachers might want to use some of the better and less racy vignettes as examples of dramatic art or storytelling. (JAF & DEF, 2007)

Partners Of The Heart    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Pass the Gravy    (1928) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Fred Guiol and Leo McCarey.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

A Passage To India    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Passion of Joan of Arc    (1928) No MPAA Rating; Director: Carl Theodor Dreyer.    See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and Past Imperfect.

Patch Adams    (1998) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some strong language and crude humor; Director: Tom Shadyac.    "I use 'Patch Adams' in my health class during the mental portion of my class... [I]t has a wealth of information about depression, happiness, dealing with problems, perception. It could be used as a way of looking at solutions to health care problems. Excellent movie." Christopher Zell, Teacher, Marysville, WA. Suggested grades: 10. [LI]

Paths Of Glory    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Patriot    (2000) MPAA Rating: R for strong war violence; Director: Roland Emmerich.    Suggested by a TWM User. Suggested grades: 9-12. See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction.

Patriot Games    (1992) MPAA Rating: R for violence, sexuality and language; Director: Phillip Noyce.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Patton    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Paw Project    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Pay It Forward    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Pearl    (1948) No MPAA Rating; Director: Emilio Fernández.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. Poor production values. [NA] (JAF)

Pearl Harbor    (2001) MPAA Rating: Rated PG-13 for sustained intense war sequences, images of wounded, brief sensuality and some language; Director: Michael Bay.    See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction.

Peege    (1972) No MPAA Rating; Director: Randal Kleiser.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The People vs. Larry Flynt    (1996) MPAA Rating: Rated R for strong sexual material, nudity, language and drug use; Director: Milos Forman.    See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction.

Perfect Harmony    (1991) No MPAA Rating; Director: Will Mackenzie.    "Perfect Harmony is excellent for racial harmony." Kathryn Shockley, Teacher, Citra, FL. Suggested grades: 9-12.

The Perfect Storm    (2000) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for language and scenes of peril. Director: Wolfgang Petersen.    This film is trite and predictable with minimal educationally beneficial content. See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction. [ITO] (JAF)

Persepolis    (2007) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for mature thematic material including violent images, sexual references, language and brief drug content; Directors: Vincent Paronnaud and Marjane Satrapi.     This is an interesting look at the results of the Iranian revolution. [LI] (JAF & DEF)

Persuasion    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Peter and Paul    (1981) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Day.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Peter Pan    (1924) No MPAA Rating; Director: Herbert Brenon.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Phantom of the Opera    (1925) No MPAA Rating; Director: Rupert Julian.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Phantom of the Opera    (2004) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for brief violent images; Director: Joel Shumacher.    "It works with English when teaching Gothic Fiction, and also with choral classes." Angee, teacher; Graham, NC. Suggested grades: 8-12. [LI]

Phenomenon    (1996) MPAA Rating: PG for language and mild sensuality; Director: John Turteltaub.    "This film could be used to illustrate Howard Gardner's ideas on multiple intelligences. It could be good at the high school level, for a psych class." Mike Barry, North Andover, MA. Suggested grades: 9-12.

Philadelphia    (1993) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some graphic language and thematic material; Director: Jonathan Demme.    Suggested by a TWM User. See the sections on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription and Reel Justice. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English. [LI]

Philadelphia Story    (1940) No MPAA Rating; Director: George Cukor.    This film is ranked #51 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). It is ranked #15 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. We found no substance but a good movie. [ITO] (JAF & DEF)

The Pianist    (2002) MPAA Rating: R for violence and brief strong language; Director: Roman Polanski.    "I just saw this movie over the weekend, and I was very moved. ... [I]t depicts the plight of the Polish Jews in Warsaw during WWII, and, in particular a brilliant young pianist and his family. It is a remarkable story with many examples of fine virtues depicted in the film as well as the opposite- extreme, obscene cruelty. I would like to see a teacher's guide for this outstanding film, and feel that teens could benefit enormously from seeing this movie and that much positive discussion would be a result. The [DVD bonus commentary] with Roman Polanski, the director of this movie, made the film even more meaningful, because he too actually lived during this horrible time in Warsaw. So, not only did the main character, the pianist, survive this horrible time, so did the director. And, perhaps, only he could have made this movie. I hope that you will consider adding this movie to your recommendations." Vivian Curry, Teacher, Blythewood, SC. Suggested grades: 11-12. [LI]

The Picture Of Dorian Gray    (1945) No MPAA Rating; Director: Albert Lewin.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Pink Floyd: The Wall    A Snippet Lesson Plan for teaching students how to derive theme from a work of fiction, has been prepared for this movie.

Pinocchio    (1940) MPAA Rating: G; Directors: Hamilton Luske and Ben Sharpsteen.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Pirates of Penzance    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

A Place in the Sun    (1951) No MPAA Rating; Director: George Stevens.    This film is ranked #92 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

Places in the Heart    (1984) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Robert Benton.    This is an excellent film to use to give an overview of the struggle of the Depression. Suggested grades: 10-12. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. [LI] (JAF)

Planet of the Apes    (1968) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Franklin J. Schaffner.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Planet Earth    See the Snippet Lesson Plans to The Arctic and Antarctica, Caves and Extremophiles, and Deep Ocean Dwellers.

Platoon    (1986) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Oliver Stone.    This film is ranked #83 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). It was Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. [LI]

Play Misty For Me    (1971) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Clint Eastwood.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Pleasantville    (1998) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some thematic elements emphasizing sexuality and for language; Director: Gary Ross.     This is a fabulous film about a brother and sister who are magically transported into the world of the brother's favorite sitcom. The film explores the meaning of passion, sexual promiscuity, adolescent outsiders ... and more. However, many parents will object to it because it shows premarital sex with only mild criticism, nudity (in a painting), and the sitcom mother discovering her own sexuality by masturbating to orgasm in the bathtub. There is one fight scene. If you can see your way through these scenes there is a tremendous amount to recommend this film. A thoughtful teacher has written to us that she finds the film useful in class but edits out the bathtub scene. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

The Plow That Broke the Plains    (1936) No MPAA Rating; Director: Pare Lorentz.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Plymouth Adventure    (1952) No MPAA Rating; Director: Clarence Brown.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Poe    (2007- Pre-production); Directed, Produced and Written by: Sylvester Stallone.    Mr. Stallone reportedly received $500,000 from a tobacco company in return for his agreement to use tobacco products during five of his movies. We find this conduct to be reprehensible. Before showing any Stallone film to children, disclose Mr. Stallone's shameful conduct and warn them about smoking. [NR]

Point of Order    (1964) No MPAA Rating; Director: Emile de Antonio.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Polar Express    (2004) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Robert Zemeckis.    "This movie shows friendship, and how to make friends. It is something we are always trying to teach our children. It teaches them to believe in something, even when it seems impossible." Pamela Becar, Teacher, Monroeville, PA. Suggested grades: Special needs children ages 13-21.

Pony Express    (1953) No MPAA Rating; Director: Jerry Hopper.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Poor Little Rich Girl    (1917) No MPAA Rating; Director: Maurice Tourneur.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor    (1936) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Dave Fleischer.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Pork Chop Hill    (1959) No MPAA Rating; Director: Lewis Milestone.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Porky in Wackyland    (1938) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Robert Clampett.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Portrait of a Lady    (1996) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for mature sensuality and some brief nudity; Director: Jane Campion.    This is an adaptation of the Henry James novel of the same name. We found the sexuality shown in this film to be unacceptable for adults to show to children. [NR] (JAF & DEF)

Postcards From the Edge    (1990) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Mike Nichols.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Powaqqatsi    (1988) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Godfrey Reggio.    See the entry for this film in Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts by John Golden, National Council of Teachers of English, 2006. (JAF & DEF)

Powder    (1995) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for intense, sometimes frightening elements of theme, and for language; Director: Victor Salva.    "This film could be used to illustrate Howard Gardner's ideas on multiple intelligences. It could be good at the high school level, for a psych class." Mike Barry, North Andover, MA. Suggested grades: 9-12.

The Power Of One    (1992) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some areas of strong violence; Director: John G. Avildsen.    Suggested by several people. This is an excellent film about apartheid in South Africa. Here is one comment from Pamela Fergus of the Assumption College School, Brantford, Ontario, Canada:
In my Learning Strategies course, grades 10-12, I have been focussing on the 6 pillars of characters as suggested by your site. I have found that "The Power of One" based on the novel by Bryce Courtnenay was a powerful visual of PK's living his life exemplifying those 6 pillars despite unbelievable tragedy and pain. "We must not allow ourselves to become like the system we oppose." These words were said by Bishop Desmond Tutu. I had my students show how PK did indeed embrace and live his entire life following Bishop Tutu's words. My suggestions is that you include "The Power of One" in your listings.
We will try to find the time to look at this movie again. [LI] (JAF)

The Power of the Press    (1928) No MPAA Rating; Director: Frank Capra.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Powers of Ten    (1977) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Charles Eames and Ray Eames.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Powwow Highway    (1989) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Jonathan Wacks.    This movie has an interesting gloss on how dysfunctional Native Americans might relate to their ancestors. It shows violence as a way to resolve disputes and escaping from jail as a way to resolve a wrongful incarceration. If you're an American Indian who is totally alienated from the United States this might be an interesting movie. [NR] (JAF)

Precious    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

President McKinley Inauguration Footage    (1901) No MPAA Rating; Director: Thomas Edison.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Prestige    (2006) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for violence and disturbing images; Director: Christopher Nolan.    This is a science fiction fantasy about magicians in early 20th century England who engage in risky stunts and a deadly competition. It's quite entertaining but has no meat. The images are truly disturbing. This movie is on the R side of PG-13. [ITO] (JAF & DEF)

Presumed Innocent    (1990) MPAA Rating: R; Directors: Alan J. Pakula.    This is not an accurate portrayal. For example, the defense attorney would never have made ex parte contact with the judge nor would he have directly threatened the judge. He would have been disbarred had the ploy backfired. The police, when they executed the warrant to search the defendant's home, would have surely found the bloody hammer in his tool box. There was no legal basis to grant the motion to dismiss. See the section on this movie in Reel Justice. For films that we recommend relating to the U.S. legal system, see the Subject Matter Index under United States/The Law [NR] (JAF)

Pretty in Pink    (1986) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Howard Deutch.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Pretty Woman    (1989) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Gary Marshall.    This film is a slick and entertaining version of the fantasy of the good prostitute who is discovered and saved by a well meaning "John". If your child sees this film tell them about a naive man we know who dated a woman who turned out to be a part-time prostitute. She kept it hidden from him for years. They lived together and she wanted to marry him. She had a daughter by a previous relationship and she frequently tried to get him into compromising situations with the child (family showers, games in the bed), all of which he had the instinct to resist. When he found out about her sexual activities she promised to stop but kept going back to it. Finally he had had enough and he left the relationship. A few weeks later the man came home to find his house occupied and searched by the police. The woman had charged that he had molested her daughter. This man is very personable and was able to deflect the suspicion of the police to some extent. When the police found no child pornography in the house, they seized his computer (thus destroying his business for which his computer was essential). The police told him that if they found a single instance of child pornography on his computer he would never get out of jail. They had the computer examined by experts and found nothing. After several harrowing weeks the investigation was dropped. All that the man lost was his business. The moral of the story is that men should beware of prostitutes claiming that the man can be their salvation. See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription. [NR] (JAF & DEF)

Pride    (2007) MPAA Rating: PG for thematic material, language including some racial epithets, and violence; Director: Sunu Gonera.    This is another entry in the "you can do it if you really try" genre even if you are an underprivileged minority. It is based on a true story and basically very beneficial. The one jarring scene is that the coach single handedly attacks and beats up the local drug dealer and two of his hoods when they are discovered trashing the recreation center and peeing into the pool. This was completely unnecessary. There were cameras right there and the culprits could have been filmed in the act. All the coach had to do was take the pictures to the DA and the hoods would be prosecuted. The coach sat out the big swim meet as penance, but didn't suffer enough of a penalty. The movie has lots of scenes of whites being prejudiced idiots. The black swim team strays into that error as well but gets called on it by the coach. The movie is reasonably well produced and it is beneficial so long as the adult showing the movie comments adversely on the fight scene. We haven't prepared a Guide for this film only because there are so many that are just as good or better (for example "Remember the Titans") and the movie is totally up front about its lessons. You don't really need a Learning Guide to use this film. Do a little research about the real coach on whose life the movie is based and you're there. [LI] (JAF & DEF 2007)

Pride and Prejudice    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Pride of The Yankees    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Primary    (1960) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Drew.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Primary Colors    (1998) MPAA Rating: R for strong language and sexual references; Director: Mike Nichols.    We are not sure of the quality of the history in this film. It is either entertaining or painful, depending on how you feel about Bill Clinton. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

Prime of Miss Jean Brodie    (1969) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Ronald Neame.     We could find no substance to this film. A teacher has an affair with several other teachers. For a film about teachers, try "Stand and Deliver". However, a teacher wrote to us recommending this film asserting that it was "Very good for English or History and to identify bias." Meghan Cameron, Teacher, Canada. Suggested grades: 11-12. [NR] (JAF & DEF)

The Prince of Egypt     (1998) MPAA Rating: PG for intense depiction of thematic elements; Directors: Brenda Chapman and Steve Hickner     There are certain things that shouldn't be put into the form of a musical and that includes the story of the enslavement of the Hebrews by the Egyptians, the leadership of Moses in the revolt that allowed the Hebrews to escape, and the acquisition of the Ten Commandments. Perhaps we simply have too much reverence for this story. We are not scholars of Genesis but it appears that there are many things added and many excluded. Why are we not shown the fact that Moses' mother served as his wet-nurse and taught him, from the beginning, that he was a Hebrew? Also, the chariot race at the beginning suggests to kids that very risky conduct is o.k. In fact, children die every day from engaging in unreasonable risks. [NR] (JAF, 2009)

The Prince of Tides    (1991) MPAA Rating: R for a scene of sex-related violence and for strong language; Director: Barbara Streisand.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Princess Bride    (1987) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Rob Reiner.     This is a delightful film that some parents tell us they watch with their children over and over again. However, we have not been able to find a way to make it educational. One teacher told us that: "I think 'The Princess Bride' can be used with elementary students (and up) in Language Arts class as an opportunity to dissect the elements of a fable." We need to rethink this. [LI] (JAF & DEF)

The Princess Diaries    (2001) Rated: G; Director: Garry Marshall.     We could find no curriculum related content. This film is a trite cliché of no value. [NR] (EF)

Princess Mononoke    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Princess Nicotine; or, The Smoke Fairy    (1909) No MPAA Rating; Director: J. Stuart Blackton.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Prisoner of Shark Island    (1936) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Ford.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Prisoners of the Sun    (1990) MPAA Rating: R for momentary strong violence; Director: Stephen Wallace.    See the sections on this movie in History Goes to the Movies and Reel Justice.

Prisoner of Zenda    (1937) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Cromwell.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. We couldn't find enough curriculum related content to justify recommending this film. Try "Les Misérables" [ITO] (JAF)

Private Benjamin    (1980) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Howard Zieff.    This film is ranked #82 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Private Confessions    (1996) No MPAA Rating; Director: Liv Ullman.     This is part of the trilogy of Ingmar Bergman's films about his parents' relationship. An excellent film for adults, it is slow moving and relates mostly to conversations. [NA] (JAF)

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex    (1939) No MPAA Rating; Director: Michael Curtiz.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Private Life of Henry VIII    (1933) No MPAA Rating; Director: Alexander Korda.    See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and History Goes to the Movies.

The Producers    (1968) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Mel Brooks.    This film is ranked #11 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Promise    (1986) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Glenn Jordan.    "This is a wonderful story of two brothers and how one older brother cares for his mentally ill brother. James Garner and James Woods star and both give riveting performances." Erica Paul, Teacher; Lockhart, Texas. Suggested grades: 9-12. [LI]

Proof    (2005) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some sexual content, language and drug references; Director: John Madden.     This is an interesting film, well written, well acted and well directed, about a mathematician and his adult daughter. We couldn't see any clear themes for teaching. We think the film will be most interesting to adults. [ITO] (JAF & DEF)

Prova d'Orchestra    See entry under "Orchestra Rehearsal".

Psycho    (1960) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Alfred Hitchcock.    This film is ranked #18 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English.

PT 109    (1963) No MPAA Rating; Director: Leslie H. Martinson.    See the section on this movie in Past Imperfect.

The Public Enemy    (1931) No MPAA Rating; Director: William A. Wellman.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Pull My Daisy    (1959) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Robert Frank and Alfred Leslie.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Pulp Fiction    (1994) MPAA Rating: R for strong graphic violence and drug use, pervasive strong language and some sexuality; Director: Quentin Tarantino.    This film is ranked #95 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Punch Drunks    (1934) No MPAA Rating; Director: Lou Breslow.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Pups Is Pups (Our Gang)    (1930) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Robert F. McGowan.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Pursuit of Happyness    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Pygmalion    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.



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