social and emotional learning family movies, family videos, family films intentional parenting
verbal, social and emotional learning

THE ADVENTURES OF MILO AND OTIS

PHRASES USING VOCABULARY WORDS


"The Adventures of Milo and Otis" is particularly rich in sophisticated words. Therefore, playing with vocabulary can be made into a separate fun activity. The following phrases have been taken from the movie. The highlighted words are those that children might not know. Using these words in the context of the script of the movie will help your child to understand them. The lessons will be repeated each time he or she sees the movie. Repeat the phrase and ask your child what the phrase means. See how many he or she can get right and give a little reward for right answers. It is also helpful to use the word in a different context.
Except for the activity up in the hayloft the farm was pretty quiet that morning.

A lot of the other animals were awakened by all the scurrying overhead.

Some of them just accepted it. Some were pretty annoyed ...

But the mood was very different up in the hayloft.

The farm cat had just given birth to her first litter. She was determined to be a good mother and never yell at her kittens. But that approach would not last very long because Milo, one of her kittens, was trouble from the very beginning. As soon as he could walk he began wandering to the edge of the hayloft.

This is the dock and down there is the river. You must never, never go too close to the dock. ... Milo was swept away by the river. Milo, do you think you can follow me back to the shore?

Months passed and the farm was humming with the sounds of summer.

Now Milo needed a brilliant idea. Aha! He thought of a place where Otis couldn't sniff him out. It worked. But Milo wondered whether it was really worth the trouble.

The following day the hen house was in an uproar. Milo and Otis went to see what all the commotion was about.

Scratched and pecked her way to the top rung of the hen house.

How long do we have to stick around this hen house?

This is the day I've become a watch dog.

Brought the usual string of gawkers ....

Your singing stinks. Will you quit it?

But this time someone got the best of Milo. "Freeze!" Otis barked. "Touch that egg and you're dead meat. I mean it punk." Otis growled.

Milo wanted just one more look at that weird animal.

The noise attracted a group of local snoops looking to dig up some scandal.

Milo's attention was focused somewhere else.

They tried to make the mixed up chick go to her mother.

Otis came back to settle the score with that thing.

The river took Milo farther down stream.

But the box was drifting right towards the hungry animal.

Close call said Milo, sticking his head up.

And Otis came up with a much more sensible plan. He ran up on the river bank leading the bear away from Milo.

By the time the moon rose, the river had carried Milo deep into a forest.

Now and then he saw some eyes flashing among the trees. And he heard mysterious hoots and growls and cries in the night.

In the water Milo could see the reflection of the moon. It seemed to be trembling as much as he was.

In that chilly, misty night, sleep was not possible. He drifted on through the darkness hoping to find the morning waiting just around the bend.

Otis had not given up his chase. He was running along the bank in hot pursuit.

He then decided to skip the whole thing.
Check out TWM's Index of Guides to Talking and Playing for Growth. For all of the TeachWithMovies.com indexes, click here.

This web page published September 14, 2007.
"Talking and Playing with Movies" and the pencil filmstrip logo are trademarks of TeachWithMovies.com, Inc. This web page © by TeachWithMovies.com, Inc. It was written by James Frieden and Lauren Humphrey. This web page was first published September 10, 2007.

social emotional learning